Forensic Genetic Genealogy: Practical, Legal & Ethical Issues 2019

Product ID: CA2999W
Presented By: State Bar of Wisconsin PINNACLE

Co-produced with the Center for Integrity in Forensic Sciences

A controversial crime-fighting method

In spring 2018, law enforcement arrested a man believed to be the Golden State Killer, a murderer who terrorized southern California in the ‘70s and ‘80s. Particularly notable about the arrest was the method used to identify the suspect: investigators uploaded DNA to a popular genealogy website, then traced the family tree of relatives who were predicted to be close genetic matches.1

The subsequent rise of forensic genetic genealogy as a tool in criminal investigations across the country has raised a hotbed of privacy and accuracy concerns. Could false distant relative matches subject innocent people to unnecessary police scrutiny? Should law enforcement have unfettered access to genetic databases? Are current privacy protections under the Fourth Amendment sufficient to contend with this new, emerging technology?

Understranding DNA

Webcasting live from New York City, nationally-recognized forensic expert Erin Murphy will share her insights on this hot topic and clear up exactly how DNA is being used in the criminal justice system.

You’ll learn:

  • What DNA statistics can and can’t do
  • Red flags that indicate a DNA case requires closer scrutiny
  • The legal status of current issues in forensic typing
Read More ↓

Pricing

Member $109.00

Non-Member $159.00

Credits

1.5 CLE

Date and Time

Monday, December 16, 201912:00 PM - 1:15 PM CT

Add to Calendar 12/16/2019 12:00:00 PM 12/16/2019 1:15:00 PM America/Chicago Forensic Genetic Genealogy: Practical, Legal & Ethical Issues 2019

Co-produced with the Center for Integrity in Forensic Sciences

A controversial crime-fighting method

In spring 2018, law enforcement arrested a man believed to be the Golden State Killer, a murderer who terrorized southern California in the ‘70s and ‘80s. Particularly notable about the arrest was the method used to identify the suspect: investigators uploaded DNA to a popular genealogy website, then traced the family tree of relatives who were predicted to be close genetic matches.1

The subsequent rise of forensic genetic genealogy as a tool in criminal investigations across the country has raised a hotbed of privacy and accuracy concerns. Could false distant relative matches subject innocent people to unnecessary police scrutiny? Should law enforcement have unfettered access to genetic databases? Are current privacy protections under the Fourth Amendment sufficient to contend with this new, emerging technology?

Understranding DNA

Webcasting live from New York City, nationally-recognized forensic expert Erin Murphy will share her insights on this hot topic and clear up exactly how DNA is being used in the criminal justice system.

You’ll learn:

  • What DNA statistics can and can’t do
  • Red flags that indicate a DNA case requires closer scrutiny
  • The legal status of current issues in forensic typing
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Co-produced with the Center for Integrity in Forensic Sciences

A controversial crime-fighting method

In spring 2018, law enforcement arrested a man believed to be the Golden State Killer, a murderer who terrorized southern California in the ‘70s and ‘80s. Particularly notable about the arrest was the method used to identify the suspect: investigators uploaded DNA to a popular genealogy website, then traced the family tree of relatives who were predicted to be close genetic matches.1

The subsequent rise of forensic genetic genealogy as a tool in criminal investigations across the country has raised a hotbed of privacy and accuracy concerns. Could false distant relative matches subject innocent people to unnecessary police scrutiny? Should law enforcement have unfettered access to genetic databases? Are current privacy protections under the Fourth Amendment sufficient to contend with this new, emerging technology?

Understranding DNA

Webcasting live from New York City, nationally-recognized forensic expert Erin Murphy will share her insights on this hot topic and clear up exactly how DNA is being used in the criminal justice system.

You’ll learn:

  • What DNA statistics can and can’t do
  • Red flags that indicate a DNA case requires closer scrutiny
  • The legal status of current issues in forensic typing
Read More ↓

Erin Murphy is a Professor at NYU School of Law, where she teaches criminal law and procedure, evidence, forensic evidence, and professional responsibility in the criminal context. Her research focuses on technology and forensic evidence in the criminal justice system, and she is a nationally-recognized expert in forensic DNA typing. Her work has been cited multiple times by the Supreme Court.

Murphy is the author of Inside the Cell: The Dark Side of Forensic DNA, a co-editor of the Modern Scientific Evidence treatise, and she also serves as the Associate Reporter for the American Law Institute's project to revise Article 213 of the Model Penal Code. She has translated her scholarly writing for more popular audiences by publishing in Scientific American, the New York Times, USA Today, Slate, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the Huffington Post, and has offered commentary for numerous media outlets, including NPR, CNN, MSNBC, and NBC Nightly News.

A proud recipient of the 2012 Podell Distinguished Teaching Award, Murphy joined the NYU faculty after five years at UC Berkeley School of Law. Prior to that, Murphy spent five years as an attorney with the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia and one year clerking for Judge Merrick B. Garland on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit. She graduated magna cum laude from Dartmouth College, class of 1995, and Harvard Law School, class of 1999.

  • Understand the basics of DNA typing and the national DNA database system
  • Gain clarity on the emerging issues surrounding forensic genetic genealogy
  • Discuss probabilistic genotyping systems and genetic genealogical searches from legal, scientific, and ethical perspectives
  • Criminal lawyers
  • Civil litigators/tort attorneys
  • Constitutional lawyers
  • Civil rights attorneys
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